When a large flooding event occurs in your area, the clean-up effort can be daunting and emotional. Unfortunately, everyone in the affected area will likely need some kind of restoration work done on their homes or businesses, making it hard for restoration companies to reach everyone who needs their help. And often, most of the large restoration companies have to focus on large-loss projects that are essential to the community such as universities and schools, factories, and grocery stores.

The 2013 Colorado floods proved to be one of the most expensive and devastating natural disaster events in state history. Abbotts Fire & Flood was there to help Coloradans state-wide clean up their properties while working with federal disaster mitigation groups and private insurance companies to get the state back to normal. In addition to 20 years of restoration experience, Abbotts was able to restore many homes and businesses- large and small.

This fall, South Carolina had a 1,000 year flooding event that affected almost the entire state. Clean-up efforts are still very much underway, as many of the main roads remain closed due to damage and water inundation. Once the waters fully recede the need for disaster restoration will be even higher, and many of the projects will likely fall under the large-loss category.

Large-loss restoration projects are best left to restoration experts, as they are much more dangerous and financially risky if they aren’t done right. The steps in a large-loss project differ from a standard restoration project due to the sheer size. Property security is perhaps the most important factor in these projects, as large compounds and buildings are easy targets to vandals, squatters and looting. Removing debris, and packing out the contents of the structure must happen before any restoration work can be done. Finally, water extraction, cleaning of both the building and its contents, mold remediation and structural repairs. Each step must be handled with the utmost care to ensure that the overall loss is minimized and that the occupants will be safe going forward.